Saturday, March 21, 2009

Tutorial... Step by Step Faux Rattan

Yesterday I posted this card featuring Faux Rattan, a technique I stumbled upon while experimenting with the texturz plates in my very very messy stampin' room.  Today, I'm going to share exactly how the Faux Rattan was created... and how to make Faux Tree Bark too!

 

wickerthoughts&prayersweb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supplies:

  • Distressed Plate from Texturz Plates # 4 Set
  • Texturz Impressions Pad and Silicone Rubber
  • Big Shot Machine with multi-purpose platform
  • Whisper White Card Stock (I used a 2.5 x 4" piece to experiment with)
  • Close To Cocoa and Creamy Caramel Classic Ink Pads
  • Brayer with soft rubber attachment (beige)
  • Section cut from your stampin' sponge
  • Versamark Ink
  • Clear Embossing Powder
  • Heat Gun

First, you're going to lay the short edge of the whisper white card stock onto the distressed plate parallel to the short edge of the plate:

 

1rattan1cbyu

 

Carefully cover with the Texturz silicone rubber and impressions pads and place entire assembly on the multi-purpose platform.

Crank 'er up.... run it through the big shot machine... that simple!!

Remove assembly from the big shot machine, and peel the piece of cardstock from the plate... place the side that was face up on the plate facing UP onto a paper protected surface.  (This would be the de-bossed vs. em-bossed surface.)

 

Now, load up your brayer with Creamy Caramel Classic Ink... it doesn't have to be perfectly covered with ink... variation in rattan is quite natural, remember? 

Brayer in the same directions as the debossed lines.  Your card stock will look like this:

 

2rattan2cbyu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next, put the creamy caramel brayered card stock face down onto the texture plate with the long side of the card stock parallel to the short end of the plate.  Take time to line it up nicely or your rattan will be skewed.

 

3rattan3cbyu

 

You want the long edge parallel to the bottom of the plate... don't worry about the vertical embossing lines because they're not straight anyway!!  And.. you cannot see the caramel inked lines because they are face down, of course.

Cover with the Texturz silicone and impressions pads as before, and run it through your big shot again.

 

 

Because it was difficult to photograph the embossed result, I combined the next two steps in the next photo.  On the right side, you can see the faint lines of embossing across the brayered card stock.

 

4rattan4cbyu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the LEFT side, you can see that I've highlighted the cross-way embossing.  This was done with a stampin' sponge... but there is a specific way it must be done:

  • First, ink up your sponge with Close to Cocoa Classic Ink
  • On your protected surface, starting OFF the cardstock, apply the ink to the card stock in the SAME direction as the newly embossed lines, wiping across the card stock.

Beginning the sponge OFF the card stock will result in nice dark edges which appear old and worn... just like a rattan surface.  If you made a mistake and didn't position your card stock correctly on the plate, you would get something that looks more like  "faux tree bark"... pretty cool, but not rattan!

 

wrongway

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But THIS is what you really want it too look like...

 

5rattan5cbyu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pretty cool... but we CAN and will do better! 

  • Turn on your heat gun and let it heat up... it will make your work go more quickly and prevent limit chances of burning your project.
  • Cover the entire surface of the card stock with Versamark Ink
  • Cover that surface with Clear Embossing Powder
  • Heat with the heat gun, moving in slow circles across the entire surface.  When it's shiny, it's done..

Here is what your "faux rattan" will now look like:

 

6rattan6cbyu

 

Pretty cool, huh??  I'd love to see what you do with this technique too!

Sharon

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8 comments:

Ret said...

Lovely card, Shron & what a great tutorial!! thanks for posting it here for us!
Ret

Anonymous said...

Wow.. this is an absolutely fabulous technique, I'm sure all your friendly SU demos will be "case'n" this idea.. I know I will!!

MaryJo Marshall said...

this is such a cool technique - I can't wait to try this and use it with my "technique" ladies!! Thanks for the tutorial!!

RuthieB said...

Sharon, I taught this to my Technique class today and they loved it!!!! You can see a sample of it on my blog post and, of course, I put a link here to your tutorial. Thank you so much for all your inspiration!

cathyscroggy said...

Sharon, Thank you for sharing that really cool technique. I used it at my demo meeting tonight and we made a purse too. The girls were loving the project. I can't say it enough. cathy s.

Betsy said...

Sharon, this is so cool! Thanks for sharing it!

BetsyZ

LeeAnn Greff said...

Wonderful! It's perfect Rattan! Thanks so much for sharing your ingenuity.

nana_cindy42 said...

Hi Sharon, It's May 31, 2011 as I write this. You mentioned 'rattan' in today's post. I've never had anything 'rattan' so I'm not sure I have ever known what it looked like. BUT it was known by its word & threat since the 1st grade! I started school in the late 40's & we were told that if we misbehaved we would be sent to the principal's office & HIT with 'The Rattan'! I never got sent there so to this day I don't know what it looked like!!
Anyway this is a great tutorial! I will try it some day!!!